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Sustainable Food Storage with Bee’s Wrap Sandwich Wrap

Do you ever feel guilty about using zip-lock baggies on your travels? They’re handy for storing your snacks and lunches, but using them a lot without washing them out and re-using them over and over means that you’re adding a bunch of plastic to the nearest landfill.

I recently started using Bee’s Wrap Sandwich Wrap for sandwiches and snacks while on the road, and it’s replaced my zip-lock baggies. I still use them for those carry-on liquids, though.

Bee’s Wrap is the sustainable alternative to plastic wrap for food storage. It’s made from simple ingredients: GOTS-certified organic cotton, sustainably sourced beeswax from the United States, organic jojoba oil, and tree resin. The wrap is reusable, so all you have to do between uses is to wash it in cool water with a mind dish soap, and let it air dry. The beeswax and jojoba oil have antibacterial qualities that help to keep your food fresh and allow you to use the Bee’s Wrap again and again.

I place my sandwich in the middle of the wrap, fold in the corners, and wrap the string around the wooden bee button. The warmth of your hands when placing the wrap around sandwiches or snacks will soften the wrap and create a seal. Once it’s cool, it’ll still hold its shape.

The Sandwich Wrap measures 13 inches by 13 inches, but there are even more Bee’s Wrap products if you find that size too limiting. There are small, medium, and large wraps; baguette wraps; bread wraps; and variety sets.

I’ve used my Sandwich Wrap for sandwiches, cheese, vegetables, fruit, and baked goods. Just remember (like with your snacks in baggies) to pack your food carefully so it doesn’t get smashed.

Bee’s Wrap Sandwich Wraps come in three different print options and list for $11 on the Bee’s Wrap site. Take advantage of the back-to-school special of a two-pack for $17.

Jill

Jill Robinson is a freelance writer who lives in a small California beach town near the big wave surf spot, Mavericks. She divides her time between writing about travel, running a kayak business and trying to wring awe-inspiring adventure out of every day. Her articles have been featured in the AFAR, National Geographic Traveler, Outside, the San Francisco Chronicle, and more. Catch up with her adventures on www.dangerjillrobinson.com and IG/Twitter at dangerjr.

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