Stay Warm and Stylish with Smartwool Merino 250 Base Layer Pattern Crew

Now that autumn temperatures are here, I’m craving cozy clothing items to wear both at home and one the road. One of the challenges of this pandemic year is living so much in super-casual home life that it’s often difficult to care about being somewhat “presentable” when I do venture out in the world.

But when your casual home uniform includes the Smartwool Merino 250 Base Layer Pattern Crew, you don’t have to think about changing clothes to go out.

First off, this is a men’s item, but women can easily wear this shirt. It comes in three patterns: wood-smoke mountain scape, medium gray tick stitch, and black Bryan Iguchi mountains. Artist and Smartwool athlete Bryan Iguchi is captivated by mountains, and his backcountry pursuits and powder-fueled dreams are reflected in every piece of art he creates, including this shirt pattern. Once I saw this shirt, I knew it had to be mine.

The crew shirt has been updated with these fresh patterns, as well as fit—to improve functionality while still looking good. Made from 100-percent merino wool with an interlock knit, the shirt is cozy, breathable, and its thermoregulation helps keep your body at just the right temperature. It’s also odor-resistant, so you can wear it for a few days without needing to wash it. People might notice, though, that you’re wearing the same thing for days on end.

The heavier 250-weight merino retains a comfortable softness, making the shirt ideal to wear all day on your adventures, or even around home. Flatlock seam construction in the shirt minimizes chafing, and shoulder panels eliminate the top shoulder seam. Both features are great when you’re wearing this shirt while hiking, climbing, biking, or skiing. The shirt has a slim fit, which is helpful when you’re layering.

This long-sleeved crew lists for $110. Get your own on the Smartwool site. A small selection is available on Amazon.com.

 

Jill

Jill Robinson is a freelance writer who lives in a small California beach town near the big wave surf spot, Mavericks. She divides her time between writing about travel, running a kayak business and trying to wring awe-inspiring adventure out of every day. Her articles have been featured in the AFAR, National Geographic Traveler, Outside, the San Francisco Chronicle, and more. Catch up with her adventures on www.dangerjillrobinson.com and IG/Twitter at dangerjr.

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